Massage, Reflexology and Healing Scratby, Emm-tec, Great Yarmouth Norfolk.

Does Emmett therapy work?

Huffington Post on Emmett Therapy.

An article in the Huffington Post addressed exactly this question. The article author with several structural health problems went for a treatment then wrote all about it in the paper.

The summary was very positive

“The (Emmett Therapy) treatment ultimately made me feel more aware about how my body feels and reminded me of how the body is supposed to feel: flexible, pain-free and moving naturally without effort. ”

My own Practitioner Emmett Therapy training began as the result of a very positive outcome for a friend who was physically ‘seizing up’. She is now up and running again.

Following two whiplash injuries my neck was a mess and I had a limited turn from side to side, minor damage to neck bones often caused problems. After my first treatment as teacher’s demo my neck improved dramatically and I can now turn close to 180 on both sides. I no longer get the pain and restriction (or displaced vertebrae that an osteopath has to fix) that used to crop up at regular intervals. For me Emmett Therapy works.

Use the Huffington Post  Does Emmett Therapy Work? link to go to the original article by Paola Bassanese.

 

See review below on Emmett Therapy Benefits.

 

 

5 Natural Ways to help in the colds and flu season

Use the 5 tips below to help you get through the winter bugs with more comfort.

1. Drink water. It is very important to keep hydrated so drink more water than usual, if you do not drink water then this is the time to start. Runny noses and sweating reduces the fluid in the body more than usual. Add a dash of lemon juice or cider vinegar if you need a little taste. Remember – coffee is not water, tea is not water, squash is not water………

2. Wash your hands and beware of public door handles, shopping trolleys etc. Keep your hands away from your face when out and about to avoid rubbing in the latest cold when you scratch your nose. Be kind to others and when you are sick carry a hand sanitiser, lots of tissues.

3. Have a bottle of eucalyptus oil to help keep your nasal passages clear, this oil is also very good to clear the head and help you think more clearly. Lemon oil is fantastic to kill off pathogens in the air and smells lovely so sprinkle some on a tissue and keep it nearby or use an atomiser, lemon will reduce the chances of you catching a bug from others. (I like UK Freshskin for this – available uk on ebay, amazon and their own website, 100ml bottles at excellent prices). You do not need the expensive organic oils for this use.

4. Learn the pressure point tapping routine that Donna Eden has compiled and she shows on Ytube. It takes just a few minutes (less than 4) daily and is a great pick me up when you are ill as well as helping keeping you healthy at other times.

5. Stroke your lymph. Easy move is as follows.

Put your index fingers at the point of your chin, stroke along your jaw line to behind your ear. From the dip behind your earlobe slide down the channel in your neck ending at the inner part of the collar bone. Do this five times. Then massage down your armpit towards your chest five times. This will help keep the lymph channels flowing and reduce congestion.

Keep healthy.

I also offer a lymphatic massage routine that is designed to keep the whole body lymphatic system in tip top condition. It is relaxing and perks you up at the same time! If you are feeling sluggish after illness this is a very refreshing treatment to get you back on your feet. In Australia this lymphatic treatment is recommended by a hospital to cancer patients to help reduce the side effects of treatment.

 

 

 

Reflexology and migraine

Reflexology & Migraine

According to a large nationwide research study undertaken in Denmark, reflexology treatment has a beneficial effect on patients suffering from migraine and tension headaches. The study was conducted at the Department of Social Pharmacy, The Royal Danish School of Pharmacy in co-operation with five reflexology associations. 220 patients participated with treatment being given by 78 fully trained reflexologist across the country.

Headaches remain the most common health problem amongst the adult population and it has been estimated that they are the reason for the loss of three mil-lion working days every year. Reflexology is renowned for its ability to help relax and calm patients and for this reason it was considered an interesting therapy to study for the treatment of tension headaches and migraine.

Of all the patients who took part in the study, 90 percent said that they had taken prescribed medication for their headaches within the month prior to the commencement of the study and, of them, 36 percent had experienced side effects from the medicines. 81 percent of the prescribed medicine in the acetvlsalicyclic acid and paracetamol group was taken at least twice a week and 72% of the stronger migraine medicines were taken at least once a fortnight which indicates that the majority of the patients were suffering from moderate to severe symptoms. 34 percent had taken medications for ailments other than headaches.

Three months after a completed series of reflexology treatments, 81 percent of patients confirmed that reflexology had either cured (16%) or helped (65%) their symptoms. 19 percent of the patients re-ported that they had been able to completely dispense with the medications they had been taking before the study.

The reflexologist also found that there was a strong link between headaches and the gall bladder, stomach, bladder, and endocrine hormone meridians. At the end of the study the patients who benefited from the treatment showed less stress on the reflex points for the ovaries, small intestine, bladder, stomach, liver and kidneys than they had experienced on their first treatment. The likelihood of successful cure was found to be greatest for: a) those patients whom the reflexologist found no stress on the reflex zones of the uterus or gall bladder, and b) younger patients who had suffered from headaches for a short period of time.

Brendstrup E, Launso L, Eriksen L. Reflexions March 1996, 10

Published in the Internet Health Library page Reflexology research migraine